Making Marks Opening

Posted by on Sep 19, 2008 in Art Coverage, Interviews

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17 Comments

  1. contributor
    September 19, 2008

    So what’s the verdict ya’ll. What did you think of the show or the video? Did the video give you a feel for the show or did it make your stomach upset with all the motion. Wish I could have interviewed more of the artists.

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  2. valuistics
    September 19, 2008

    The video gave me a headache, but it did really capture the show. I think the show was a success. It may not have seemed like a lot of people at the opening reception, but that is an average or above-average crowd for a MOCA opening. I spoke with J. Marshall Adams and he felt the show was a success and is looking forward to curating more Jacksonville Creates shows, like every two years. A Jacksonville Biennale, so to speak.

    I think the show was good but as you pointed out, there was a real old-timers vs. youngsters dynamic to it. It helped create a good balance, but I felt the work was segregated according to which gallery it appeared in. I don;t know…

    Anyone else pick up that vibe?

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  3. globatron
    September 19, 2008

    Maybe it should have been called Old School/New School.

    There was definitely a difference in the types of work and I suppose they wanted to put like with like. Makes sense from a curatorial perspective but it does make me wonder what is considered “contemporary” in Jacksonville as the difference between the two schools was very apparent.

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  4. globatron
    September 19, 2008

    Maybe it’s not an old school / new school thing at all. If I remember correctly some of the work that was with the older artists was also from younger artists. Now that I think about it it’s more like work with like work.

    But that still makes me wonder about there being two very different types of work. Or is that true either?

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  5. valuistics
    September 19, 2008

    Right- it was definitely ‘like work with like work,’ so in that respect, it was a well-curated show. Curating a show like this has got to present a lot of frustrating challenges, so my props to Ben and Matthew and Madeline. What I am trying to get my finger on is perhaps more ‘traditional approaches vs less traditional approaches.’ for there were plenty of youngsters doing quite traditional approaches and a couple old timers with less traditional approaches.

    Significant form. That’s what I look for and how I judge a piece’s success, I guess. And well, I know I don’t just speak for myself when I say that I felt that there were quite a few (young and old) straight-up painters or folks working in a painterly way simply dialing it in.

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  6. globatron
    September 19, 2008

    A question I would have maybe is what is contemporary art for Jacksonville?

    Some of the work I saw was questionably in that genre. Not that it’s a bad thing but it is a contemporary art museum. Was the show a contemporary art show or just a survey of local art.

    love this conversation James. Maybe you and I should call each other instead as others don’t seem to be into talking about it. The politics of putting this show on alone are remarkable I’m sure.

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  7. kurt polkey
    September 19, 2008

    I was really pleased with the show. I hope we can use it as a little springboard for some better things.
    I would have liked to have seen Steve Williams’ work represented and I think it would have been nice to see one of Morrison’s video.

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  8. contributor
    September 19, 2008

    Yeah Steve Williams has done a lot for the Jacksonville art scene, and it would have been nice to see him included.

    Morrison also would have been a nice addition.

    Who else would it have been nice to see in the show?

    I loved the installation by Jenny Hager. I would love to learn more about her work. If she reads this I’d really enjoy interviewing you.

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  9. markcreegan
    September 19, 2008

    big ups to Byron and James for making the most timely and relevant works in the show! Polarbears and drowning USA- never the more apt metaphors for our current situation (like TODAY!)

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  10. markcreegan
    September 19, 2008

    like this

    Reply
  11. valuistics
    September 20, 2008

    Thanks! There were some fantastic works there that were not about anything timely, topical or in the news. Mark, your piece made me happy and I too was entranced by Jenny’s piece. There was a great variety of work and it seems like the line I get from others who attended the show was that they liked that aspect the most. But the question is worth asking- what is new for Jacksonville?

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  12. contributor
    September 20, 2008

    New for Jacksonville artists or new for Jacksonville.

    Well. I tell you I’ve never seen an installation like Jenny Hagers by a Jacksonville artist ever. I’m pretty new back to town though after my last round of wanderlust but I do think that. Mark’s piece was definitely different and I agree it made me happy. Thank you Mark.

    James your piece was quite interesting also I thought but I guess we are all just giving each other back rubs at this point.

    The one piece that I thought stood out was the Jenny Hager installation. I could see that at the Whitney. really could. I’ve never seen a rotating projector before. I’m sure it’s nothing new but I’ve never seen one. And the craftsmanship of the box and such was really tight.

    I was glad to see Dustin Harewood do some interesting work about greed. I thought that was quite topical also.

    Glad you dug my drawings Mark. I wish they would have put the web project that coincided with it on the label though. No biggee.
    http://www.byronking.com/polarbrokers for folks who didn’t see it. The drawings again were just supporting elements for that project.

    But a follow up question would be did anyone see any themes for the show? Anything that sort of gelled? God I’d think a lot of folks would want to talk about this show. It’s maybe the biggest show to ever happen in Jax art history ever. maybe? What little history we have.

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  13. markcreegan
    September 20, 2008

    Yes Jenny’s installation is incredible. And i also do not recall ever seeing a rotating video.

    I appreciate the curatorial intent of this show to encourage local artists to try something new, expand their ideas, have fun, etc. We didn’t see this with all the works but it was ubiquitous enough to show that there are artists in this city who want to explore many different things, to surprise themselves and others.

    What i hope this show provides is a refreshed understanding of art as exploration and experimentation rather than just a professional, decorative activity.

    There have been a few venues over the years where this experimental approach reigned (Seesaw. Opaq). My hope is that something more expansive and permanent could come out of this show.

    As far as artists who I would have liked to see included, off the top of my head: Matt and Katie Allison, Tina and Lance Veitch (the Process Organic folks from Opaq), Nestor Gil, and David Lauderdale.

    Reply
  14. kurt polkey
    September 20, 2008

    I liked Jenny’s video installation too. Sometimes I feel like we are guilty of liking something too much just because it seems new to us or new to Jacksonville. Jenny’s video was great, but the idea of a video installation certainly isn’t new. I’m not sure but I think it was even dated a few years ago, so it wasn’t even new for her. So, the idea of any artist in the show being new or experimental just isn’t true. All that said I don’t think that aspect is all that important, I think the quality of the work in the show matters much more than originality. And I agree that the artists mentioned in the other comments had some of the best work.

    Congratulations you guys. I know I came away a little more inspired.

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  15. valuistics
    September 20, 2008

    No doubt originality affects the quality of a work, though. But I agree, nothing in the show was what you’d call NEW in a broader art sense. My question was more about to what extent the show represents a step in a new direction for Jacksonville. I think we are in agreement that it does represent a positive move. It sounds like the MOCA will continue to use local shows like this to energize and involve the art community here, and that is encouraging.

    What I find interesting is how relatively small the non-artist average-public museum audience is compared to the sizable artist community that filled the museum the other night. It goes to show just how vital a role artists play in Jacksonville’s cultural establishment. It is gratifying to see that recognized.

    Congrats to everybody on a milestone show! Here’s to the future of art in Jacksonville. Next up is the question of what will happen if UNF and MOCA join forces.

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  16. mark creegan
    September 20, 2008

    yes, i think that perhaps there is now a growing sense (in the minds of the artists and others) of the process of being an artist as an evolving creative experience. So, instead of the artists as “the painter of light” or the “photographer of feet”, its the artist as meme maker, idea juggler, material manueverer, or simply as a creative experience maker.

    I was once thought of as the guy who painted drums, but i moved away from that and redirected things naturally. So now i hope the perception is “here is an artist exploring ideas, materials, etc.”

    Also, i perceive a shift away from the stereotype of what an artist should be, or act. No more putting on a show, wearing pants with paint splatters at openings like you just came from the studio (unless thats legit). Basically a move away from focusing on the personality and more on the process and journey.

    And generally i also see perhaps a lessening of the stranglehold of painting in Jax. Now I LOVE painting, dont get me wrong. I expect it to dominate here as it dominates everywhere. All i am saying is i think there will be more diversity from here on out.

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  17. Contemporary Conversations/Films at MOCA | Globatron
    November 18, 2008

    […] See Photos to the Making Marks show HERE. See video from the opening night HERE. […]

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